rileyo
martinhiddlespig:

Casually having a tardis as your porch on your live aboard boat 🚢❤ #gweek #Cornwall #drwho #tardis #doctorwho (at Gweek)

martinhiddlespig:

Casually having a tardis as your porch on your live aboard boat 🚢❤ #gweek #Cornwall #drwho #tardis #doctorwho (at Gweek)

jamarrob:

thoughtsareextraordinary:

WOW

my mama always taught us to do this 👌

jamarrob:

thoughtsareextraordinary:

WOW

my mama always taught us to do this 👌

cumbertrekky:

Source:-
https://twitter.com/kibooki/status/524283133055614977
fellowfrockery:

Gough Whitlam symbolises the legal return of country to Gurindji traditional owners at Kalkarindji (part of Wave Hill cattle station) in August 1975 after a long and bruising fight for justice, trickling red dirt into the hand of Vincent Lingiari. Aboriginal traditional owners, who were house and stock workers, had been on strike since a walk-off in 1966. British pastoralist and ‘squatter’, Lord Vestey, fought them for their right to the land and to “pay” them in substandard food and repellent housing. While the powerful image is concentrated on the solemnity and dignity of the occasion, and the two large hands in the centre of the picture, I’m also moved by the home-made mend on Mr Lingiari’s trousers, and his too-big, very new shirt still bearing crease marks from its packet. He had  just recently come home from hospital.
The gesture with the dirt was said to have been a spontaneous one by serving Prime Minister Mr Whitlam, who died today aged 98. Mr Lingiari, OAM, a stockman, musician, custodian and activist, died in 1988, aged 80.
This the photograph, in the collection of the Art Gallery of NSW, taken by Mervyn Bishop, that has become iconic in Australian history. The moment is also celebrated in the Paul Kelly/Kevin Carmody song, ‘From Little Things, Big Things Grow’
Mr Whitlam had just announced, “On this great day, I, Prime Minister of Australia, speak to you on behalf of all Australian people – all those who honour and love this land we live in. For them I want to say to you: I want this to acknowledge that we Australians have still much to do to redress the injustice and oppression that has for so long been the lot of Black Australians. Vincent Lingiari, I solemnly hand to you these deeds as proof, in Australian law, that these lands belong to the Gurindji people and I put into your hands part of the earth itself as a sign that this land will be the possession of you and your children forever.”
The State Library of Victoria holds many documents, books, pictures and relics of this era, accessible on the catalogue at www.slv.vic.gov.au.

fellowfrockery:

Gough Whitlam symbolises the legal return of country to Gurindji traditional owners at Kalkarindji (part of Wave Hill cattle station) in August 1975 after a long and bruising fight for justice, trickling red dirt into the hand of Vincent Lingiari. Aboriginal traditional owners, who were house and stock workers, had been on strike since a walk-off in 1966. British pastoralist and ‘squatter’, Lord Vestey, fought them for their right to the land and to “pay” them in substandard food and repellent housing. While the powerful image is concentrated on the solemnity and dignity of the occasion, and the two large hands in the centre of the picture, I’m also moved by the home-made mend on Mr Lingiari’s trousers, and his too-big, very new shirt still bearing crease marks from its packet. He had  just recently come home from hospital.

The gesture with the dirt was said to have been a spontaneous one by serving Prime Minister Mr Whitlam, who died today aged 98. Mr Lingiari, OAM, a stockman, musician, custodian and activist, died in 1988, aged 80.

This the photograph, in the collection of the Art Gallery of NSW, taken by Mervyn Bishop, that has become iconic in Australian history. The moment is also celebrated in the Paul Kelly/Kevin Carmody song, ‘From Little Things, Big Things Grow’

Mr Whitlam had just announced, “On this great day, I, Prime Minister of Australia, speak to you on behalf of all Australian people – all those who honour and love this land we live in. For them I want to say to you: I want this to acknowledge that we Australians have still much to do to redress the injustice and oppression that has for so long been the lot of Black Australians. Vincent Lingiari, I solemnly hand to you these deeds as proof, in Australian law, that these lands belong to the Gurindji people and I put into your hands part of the earth itself as a sign that this land will be the possession of you and your children forever.”

The State Library of Victoria holds many documents, books, pictures and relics of this era, accessible on the catalogue at www.slv.vic.gov.au.

itscolossal:

Installed earlier this month in the Bahamas, “Ocean Atlas" by Jason deCaires Taylor depicts a young Bahamian girl carrying the weight of the seas. It is the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater and is built from special concrete that promotes the growth of coral and marine life in an attempt to draw diving tourists away from more sensitive areas nearby.

yogandree:

Yoga for Writers | Electric Literature

Straight away breaking with convention, Gough Whitlam and his loyal deputy Lance Barnard were appointed as a “ministry of two”.

They immediately moved to withdraw troops from Vietnam and release all draft-dodgers from prison. They recognised the People’s Republic of China and established the Department of Aboriginal Affairs, raising the issue to Cabinet level. 

During the Whitlam government’s three years in office, a record number of bills were enacted, and change swept through the nation.

In the education sector, university fees were abolished and needs-based funding for government schools was brought in. The health system was forever changed, with the introduction of Medibank, now known as Medicare.

The Labor government established Legal Aid, created a national Family Court, and brought in the world’s first no-fault divorce procedures. The voting age was lowered from 21 to 18 and welfare payments were introduced to support mothers and the homeless.

The Racial Discrimination Act 1975 ratified the UN convention. The Aboriginal Land Rights Act passed, and the prime minister officially handed over the title deeds of traditional lands in the Northern Territory to the Gurundji people at Wattle Creek. “I want to promise you that this act of restitution which we perform today will not stand alone,” he said.

In the arts, Mr Whitlam launched the construction of the National Gallery of Australia and bought Jackson Pollock’s Blue Poles for $1.3 million – setting a record for the highest price paid for a piece of modern art. He established both the Australian Film Commission and the Australia Council.”

And that’s just a taste. Vale Gough Whitlam.

quiet-desperati0n:

I am a feminist because
I don’t think this video could be much more relevant.

Here’s a sure-fire way to know that you hate women: when an incident of intimate partner violence in which a man knocks a woman unconscious gains national attention and every question or comment you think to make has to do with her behavior, you really hate women. Like, despise.

There is no other explanation. There is no “I need all the facts.” There is no excuse. You hate women. Own it.

Now, you probably don’t believe you hate women. You probably honestly think you’re being an objective observer whose only interest is the truth. You are delusional.

We have this problem in our discourse around the most important challenges we face where we feel we have to be “fair to both sides.” But sometimes, one of those sides is subjugation and oppression. If you’re OK with legitimizing that side in the interest of “fairness,” you’re essentially saying you’re OK with oppression as a part of the human condition. That’s some hateful shit.

Mychal Denzel Smith, "How to know that you hate women" (via thepeoplesrecord)
historicalagentcarter:

This fantastic little booklet was issued to US troops headed to Britain in 1942. It contains some useful pointers and charming attempts at cultural sensitivity.
On “British Women at War,” the following information is given:

A British woman officer or non-commissioned officer can and often does give orders to a man private. The men obey smartly and know it is no shame. For British women have proven themselves in this war. They have stuck to their posts near burning ammunition dumps, delivered messages afoot after their motorcycles have been blasted from under them. They have pulled aviators from burning planes. They have died at gun posts and as they fell another girl has stepped directly into the position and “carried on.” There is not a single record in this war of any British woman in uniformed service quitting her post or failing in her duty under fire.
Now you understand why British soldiers respect the women in uniform. They have won the right to the utmost respect. When you see a girl in khaki or air-force blue with a bit of ribbon on her tunic - remember she didn’t get it for knitting more socks than anyone else in Ipswich.

The full text can be read here. Here is a story from LIFE magazine outlining the use of the booklet. eatingcroutons has also posted a photo of this excerpt from the booklet, which you can see here.

historicalagentcarter:

This fantastic little booklet was issued to US troops headed to Britain in 1942. It contains some useful pointers and charming attempts at cultural sensitivity.

On “British Women at War,” the following information is given:

A British woman officer or non-commissioned officer can and often does give orders to a man private. The men obey smartly and know it is no shame. For British women have proven themselves in this war. They have stuck to their posts near burning ammunition dumps, delivered messages afoot after their motorcycles have been blasted from under them. They have pulled aviators from burning planes. They have died at gun posts and as they fell another girl has stepped directly into the position and “carried on.” There is not a single record in this war of any British woman in uniformed service quitting her post or failing in her duty under fire.

Now you understand why British soldiers respect the women in uniform. They have won the right to the utmost respect. When you see a girl in khaki or air-force blue with a bit of ribbon on her tunic - remember she didn’t get it for knitting more socks than anyone else in Ipswich.

The full text can be read here. Here is a story from LIFE magazine outlining the use of the booklet. eatingcroutons has also posted a photo of this excerpt from the booklet, which you can see here.